Hard Work, Dedication, Stealth, and More… (Day 5)

The past two weeks, Little Miss’ bedtime routine has been exactly the same.  We start putting her to bed between a certain time, and then after she is fully asleep, she is gently placed in her crib.  She wakes up at least once, as she is lowered into her crib, forcing me to pick her back up, rock her gently back to sleep, and then attempt to put her back in her bed.  I’m getting stealthy enough, my second attempt of putting her in her bed is usually successful.  However, the other night, I decided that the stealth required is tantamount to what I would consider is required to be a ninja.

Therefore, the word for today is:

Ninja.

Ninjas are quiet, stealthy, and efficient.  They get their jobs done quickly, without reservation, and usually come and go without being noticed.  They typically have a set uniform, purposefully designed to be successful in their role as guardian, protector, and warrior.  To me, when I envision ninjas, I call to mind no-nonsense kinds of people.

And, given my latest escapades at bedtime in this house, I also have decided that mothers (and fathers, too) are called to be ninjas in their households.

Any parent with a small child knows how excruciatingly important the bedtime routine is to their children.  Furthermore, every parent who does not do the “cry it out method,” also knows the importance of stealthiness while leaving the bedroom when the child has finally fallen asleep.  In fact, some nights, a parent would rather forgo breathing in order to make sure there is no extra noise in the child’s bedroom, as they exit the bedroom.  The stealth required to avoid discarded toys or creaks in the floorboards makes me think of ninjas.

Furthermore, most parents I know usually have the ability to be no-nonsense, especially when laying down the law.  The parents remain unnoticed, quite simply because their children don’t recognize the silent force that is the parent, until the child is in need of something (typically food-related).  Most parents I know also get their jobs done around the house quickly, oftentimes irked by the sloth-like qualities of their offspring.

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We are blessed to have a secondary ninja in this household – only observed on camera by two little dots…

So, this post is to acknowledge that parents should give themselves a pat on their backs, and the backs of other parents.

Because being a ninja is hard work.  It takes effort, dedication, loyalty, stealth, the ability to blend in with one’s surroundings, and an overall commitment level to their art.

Just like parenting.

So, this morning, I will raise my mug of coffee to all the other ninjas in the world, and tonight, I will continue to hone my art of ninja-ing at my children’s bedtime.

9 Comments

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  1. super cute picture! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Amen!!!! We did the semi-cry it out method, but have done our fair share of “ninja’ing too!!!”

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I love the thought of parents as ninjas. To be honest that part never changes even when your children are adults and on their own. You have to be a ninja to give advice in such a way it is not perceived as advice and they think it is something they thought of. That way the peace is kept and everyone is happy :). Keep practicing those ninja skills!!! They are always useful.

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  4. Ninjas, indeed! I think all parents eventually acquire the skill. It reminds me of something that happened to me yesterday. After dropping off my kids at school I picked up some meds my MIL needed. I wanted to drop them off with some groceries at her house but I knew she’d still be asleep. I had keys so I quietly let myself in, put away the groceries and meds and left her a note. An hour later she called me up asking how in the world I did that without waking her. I told her as a mom of four I’ve learned to move quietly like a ninja. She just laughed. So that’s proof positive, moms are ninjas! LOL. BTW, thanks for linking up!

    Liked by 1 person

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