JEI 1: From 1800’s to Present Day (All About Clothes)

This is my first participation in The Zelie Group‘s weekly “Just Enough Info” (JEI) blog hop and link up.  JEI is posted once a week, and provides readers with a little more insight into who we are as the women behind the screen.  Usually, there is one theme previously identified, followed by three writing prompts.  I hope you will enjoy this weekly series!

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If you had to wear clothes from a different time period, what would it be?

I think it’s safe to say I was born in the wrong era.

Growing up, I would scour the pages of our Encyclopedia Britannica, paying special attention to the high necklines, long skirts, buttoned boots of the Victorian Era.  I envisioned myself as a member of the Royal Court at times, while simultaneously feeling drawn to the images of the Suffragettes.

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Five years ago, my answer to this question would have been the Victorian Era.  Since having children, I have had a change of heart.

Have you seen the Netflix Original Series, The Crown?  If not, I highly recommend it.  I began binge-watching it on Election night; as the results rolled in, I voraciously watched episode after episode of The Crown.  The binging continued the next night…  One of those nights, I gasped, turned to my husband and exclaimed, “that is what I need to wear!”

Not the crown, mind you, but the dress that has a modest neckline, skirt that hits mid-calf (so I can bend over to scoop children up without flashing people behind me), and sturdy heeled shoes.

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I have seriously asked myself how this fashion went “out of style”!

Classy, modest, and fit for a queen – literally.  The only thing missing is my must-have in a wardrobe – it must be easy and discreet to nurse.  That said, given today’s fashion savviness, that should be easy to rectify!

What are you embarrassed that you wore, but used to think was cool?

I was once banned from wearing turtleneck tank tops, even though I still think I looked good in them…

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Okay, not me!  But, I felt ready to take on the world in these things.

But, my initial answer to this question, however, was platform tennis shoes.  I. loved. those. clodhoppers!  I felt the way I imagine the foot model below feels – light and airy!

Any guesses on how one becomes a foot model, anyway?

What is your favorite article of clothing in your closet right now?

I am a nursing mama, who values tank tops and modesty.  So, what is my solution?

You guessed it!

The crocheted and knitted scarves are treasured gifts, since I don’t do either craft.  The scarves from my husband and brother, from their deployments to Afghanistan, can serve as head coverings (veils) at church.

My collection of only 22 scarves has served me well throughout the years.  On days when the weather is in the 40’s, a scarf keeps me nice and warm; the next day, when the weather is in the 70’s, I’m able to maintain some sense of modesty (true story from this past weekend).  Furthermore, with the right scarf, I don’t need to worry about a nursing cover – the scarf takes care of that for me!

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I’d love to hear from you – either in your own blog post, or in the comments section below!  What would your answers be to the questions of:

  • If you had to wear clothes from a different time period, what would it be?
  • What are you embarrassed that you wore, that you used to think was cool?
  • What is your favorite article of clothing in your closet right now?
  • Did you ever wear platform tennis shoes?

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10 thoughts on “JEI 1: From 1800’s to Present Day (All About Clothes)

  1. Looks like we’re decade sisters! That silhouette is just so feminine. Definitely easier to move in than the Victorian getup, too. 🙂

    David and I were Downton Abbey superfans, and nothing has been able to replace it. Unfortunately we don’t have Netflix…it looks like The Crown might be able to rival Downton, though!

    I love that you clarified that the turtleneck pictures weren’t of you. I didn’t have platforms of my own, but I did have an olive green turtleneck sweater that I wore until it was more pill than sweater. So sad to see it go. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I enjoyed numerous binge episodes of Downton Abbey when my husband was deployed! I never finished it, though, since I got behind once he came home.

      And, completely agree that the 50’s getup is much less confining than Victorian dress.

      I was never as big a fan of turtleneck sweaters, simply because they were always too loose on me. However, I am not opposed to them now that I own a belt (although, chances are, the material in the sweater wouldn’t be conducive to a belt)!

      I have a love-hate relationship with fashion…

      Like

  2. Last year we went to the Dicken’s Fair in San Francisco. Basically the best excuse ever to get dressed up in Victorian fancy and immersed in the London of the 1800s. It’s awesome!
    I just got cast in a play set in Edwardian England and I’m REALLY hoping we get to have period costumes! Thanks for linking up!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. 50s style seems to be the winner in this week’s link -up! I must admit, I never wore platform tennis shoes. And that’s a great scarf collection! I have a few nice ones, but I’m usually too hit in them. Welcome to the linkup!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think you are correct – 50’s does seem to be the “go-to” style. I love my scarves, but definitely understand feeling too hot – I have winter weight ones, summery silk ones, and every thickness in between!

      Thank you for stopping by and leaving a comment!

      Like

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